Japanese championships

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sf2l
Posts: 147
Joined: Fri 03 Sep, 2010 12:43 pm

Japanese championships

Post by sf2l » Sat 22 Jun, 2013 1:34 pm

Japan organizes the National championships of Number Placement and Puzzle.
Both championships will be held on August 3rd. Busy day.
As known, the word "sudoku" in Japan is a trademark.
this is the link to the webpage. http://jppuzzles.com/en/
there is a chance that instructions will be available in English
Last edited by sf2l on Sat 22 Jun, 2013 4:38 pm, edited 2 times in total.

detuned
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Re: Japanese championships

Post by detuned » Sat 22 Jun, 2013 1:46 pm

Yuhei has said he'll be trying his best to help international participation. Although as an aside, having had a (non-competitive) go at previous iterations of the JPC, I must say that part of the charm is trying to decode the instructions to various puzzles using only the provided examples/solutions...

kiwijam
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Joined: Wed 01 Jun, 2011 10:03 am

Re: Japanese championships

Post by kiwijam » Tue 30 Jul, 2013 4:12 am

The instruction books have been published today for both the Japanese Puzzle Champs and the Japanese "Sudoku" Champs next weekend.
As Tom mentioned, it is fun to go through them like an "instructionless" contest first.
I'm not sure if an English translation will be provided by a Japanese competitor. I've got a basic knowledge and have used Google translate to get the general idea of all of them. I'd say 5/34 need Japanese knowledge, but the other 29/34 don't, which is plenty really! I'll post my translations tomorrow if needed.

kiwijam
Posts: 708
Joined: Wed 01 Jun, 2011 10:03 am

Re: Japanese championships

Post by kiwijam » Wed 31 Jul, 2013 12:09 am

There are practise puzzles for some of the new types at http://jppuzzles.com/en/practice/. And there's a test submission page.

Here are my personal notes.
They will give an idea of how to do each puzzle. They will not always be complete rules. I'm not convinced Puzzle 34 is exactly right. And the names might be quite wrong.

Two of the puzzles (7 and 17) require Japanese characters in the answer key. I wouldn't know how to enter them even if I solved the puzzle.
Three more (2,14,24) need some Japanese knowledge while solving, although a quick 'translate' during the test might be enough.

---------------

1) Cross Maths
Enter the digits 1 to 9 in the empty cells. The equations are always calculated from left to right or top to bottom, with no difference between the +-×÷ characters.
Solution Code: Enter the numbers in the cells marked A-D. e.g. 3489.

2) What's Next?
Japanese
[but they're multi-choice, and there's no points off for a wrong answer, so have a guess...?]

3) Beijing seek
Find three copies (two in the example) of the word Beijing, each bent at 90 degrees in one place.
Solution Code: Enter the number of letters used in the two main diagonals, A-B. e.g. 21.

4) JPC & JNPC Split
Group the areas into regions along the dotted lines, all containing either J,P,C or J,N,P,C.
Solution Code: Enter the number of different regions that touch each marked column (left to right), and each marked row (top to bottom). e.g. 3444

5) Drawing Logic
Standard Hanjie/Nonogram
Solution Code: In the specified 5x5 block, how many cells are painted? e.g. A is the central of the 9 5x5 blocks, and contains 11 (of 25) painted cells, so 11.

6) Square split
Divide the grid into perfect squares of various sizes. The clues give how many squares are found in that row/column.
SC: How many squares are there in total? e.g. 8.

7) Anarchy puzzle
Japanese.

8) Chinese Cities Scrabble
Basic Scrabble, using Japanese characters. Some words in the word list are followed by brackets which give another word that it intersects with. Treat 'subscript' characters the same as large characters (if you even notice the difference).
SC: Enter the number of characters in the arrow-marked row. e.g. 2.

9) Combination of Building Blocks
Which of the answer shapes can be constructed from the given building blocks? Two of them (one in the example) cannot.
SC: enter the two letters for the shapes that can't be constructed, in alphabetical order. e.g. B.

10) Best Tent Site
Standard Tents/Camping/Zeltlager.
SC: Enter the number of tents along the two A,B diagonals. e.g. 23.

11) Number connection
Draw a single line from 1 through 2, 3, 4, ..., passing through each cell once each.
SC: Enter the number of cells that the line passes through (strictly) between the given points. e.g. 1to2 = 2 cells, 4to5 = 8 cells, so 28.

12) Star Triplets
Draw straight lines through sets of three stars. The lines cannot touch or cross. Use all the stars.
SC: How many lines cross each column, left to right. e.g. 01332.

13) Indecision of Ls
Paint some areas blacks to create L-shapes with width one. The Ls do not touch each other, even diagonally. There will be no 2x2 white regions anywhere.
SC: Give the number of painted cells in the directions of the arrows A,B, e.g. 33.

14) Find number pairs
Japanese

15) Form of love
Pair up the little polyomino cells. Draw the polyomino (same orientation) so that it includes the paired cell, and the two polyominoes touch along an edge at least but don't overlap. Each pair of polyominoes cannot touch another pair along an edge.
SC: Give the number of used cells in the directions of the arrows A,B, e.g. 32.

16) Number Net
Write a 1-7 in each empty cell. Each triple contains three different digits.
If two triples are connected by a "1" then they have exactly one identical digit in the same position. If two triples are connected by a "2" then they have exactly two identical digit in the same positions. If two triples are connected by a tilda "~" then they have the same three digits but all in different positions.
SC: Enter the contents of the cells marked A-D, e.g. 4664.

17) Pass search
Japanese

18) Carpet circuit
Draw a line from the start arrow to the finish arrow passing through some cells, and not crossing any thick lines. The numbers show how many of te surrounding four shaded squares are visited by the line.
SC: Enter the letters that the line passes through, in order. e.g. BAC.

19) Star Battle
Place 1 star in each row, column and region. They cannot touch each other even diagonally.
SC: Give the number of stars in the directions of the arrows A,B, e.g. 10.

20) Doublet Formula
Enter digits from 1-9 in the empty cells to make the equations correct. Only one digit will change between any pair of consecutive rows, the others will stay the same.
SC: Enter the contents of the cells marked A-D, e.g. 1163.

21) Sum Block Division
Divide the grid into regions containing two numbers each. The size of the region equals the sum of the two numbers. Regions of the same size cannot touch each other (i.e. fillomino).
SC: Enter the size of the regions that contain the cells marked A-D, e.g. 5656.

22) Tripod Division
Divide the grid into regions of size 4. Two regions with the same shape (i.e. I,L,O,T,Z) cannot touch along an edge. A circle indicates the wall must branch into three pieces at that point (branching can also occur where there are no circles).
SC: Enter the shape of the regions that contain the cells marked A-D, e.g. LTZI. (note use Z, not S as in LITS puzzles)

23) Curve Data
Draw shapes into the grid, one through each symbol, so that every cell is used exactly once. The symbols show how that shape bends and branches, although the lengths of the line segments can be distorted.
SC: Give the number of cells used by the largest symbol. e.g. 7.

24) Reasoning Place
Japanese

25) ONDO-K
Basic Thermometers.
No idea why this name is in Roman letters instead of Japanese characters, and Ondo is a type of Japanese folk music...?
SC: Give the number of painted cells in the directions of the arrows A,B, e.g. 21.

26) Sum Cross
Basic Kakuro.
Why do we give it a Japanese name, and they give it an English name? Perhaps it is a trademark there.
SC: Enter the contents of the cells marked A-D, e.g. 4327.

27) Consecutive Sum Cross
Normal kakuro rules, but also a thick bar is drawn between every pair of adjacent cells that differ by exactly one.
SC: Enter the contents of the cells marked A-D, e.g. 4327.

28) ABC Place
Easy as ABCD puzzle, clues show the first visible letter. The example uses ABC instead of ABCD.
SC: Enter the contents of the cells that the arrow points at, using "X" for empty cells. e.g. XCXXX.

29) Sorcerer (also Lines)
Each row and column contains an A,B,C, and D (ABC in example). Rows or columns with the same symbol have their letters in the same order. Rows or columns with different symbols have their letters in a different order. The only special symbol is the "A"-character (あ) which always has the order "ABCD" (or "ABC").
SC: Enter the contents of the cells that the arrow points at, using "X" for empty cells. e.g. XXAXAX.

30) Battleship
Normal Battleships.
SC: Give the number of ship cells in the directions of the arrows A,B, e.g. 22.

31) Inequality Battleship
Normal Battleships rules, plus the equality and inequality signs show the comparative number of ship-filled cells on each side of the symbol, along that whole row/column. No ships can be drawn on the symbols themselves.
SC: Give the number of ship cells in the directions of the arrows A,B, e.g. 12.

32) Symmetry Loop
Draw a single loop that passes through every cell. A thick bar inside the grid indicates that the two cells on each side of the bar are a mirror image of each other. A thin bar indicates they are not a mirror image.
SC: For the given rows, give the number of corners in the loop. e.g. 6466.

33) BLT Sandwich
What a great name for a puzzle!
Each row and column has two slices of bread (P), one bacon (B), one lettuce (L), and one tomato (T) (plus two empty cells). Note that the Japanese usually use English words for foreign items, but in the case of bread "Pan" comes from the Portuguese word, they were the first Europeans to reach Japan. "Tempura" is also originally a Portuguese word, but now I'm off-topic...
The outer clues give, in no particular order, the ingredients that are between the two breads of that row/column. An "x" indicates that there are no ingredients between the two breads.
SC: Enter the contents of the shaded row, using "X" for an empty cell. e.g. BXPTLPX.
[Hint for starting Example: Where can an L go along the bottom row?]

34) Masked One-sided Hex Pieces
Place all the pieces into the grid without overlapping. They can be rotated but not reflected. Each shape includes one number. Shapes with the same numbers are a reflection of each other.
I think the final puzzle will have pieces of size 6, rather than size 5 of the example.
SC: Enter the numbers inside the regions that contain the cells marked A-D, e.g. 1432.
Last edited by kiwijam on Thu 01 Aug, 2013 12:23 am, edited 2 times in total.

david mcneill
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Re: Japanese championships

Post by david mcneill » Wed 31 Jul, 2013 8:08 am

Nice work James. Don't know whether I'll have much time to look at these. Anyone know what the extra rule is for puzzle 22 in the JNPC? I have multiple solutions so I'm guessing I'm missing something.

david mcneill
Posts: 447
Joined: Mon 21 Jun, 2010 2:02 pm

Re: Japanese championships

Post by david mcneill » Wed 31 Jul, 2013 4:34 pm

OK. Got it. The extra resources referenced earlier in the thread refer to this puzzle as Gravity Number Place.

Nilz
Posts: 279
Joined: Fri 02 Sep, 2011 5:21 pm

Re: Japanese championships

Post by Nilz » Wed 31 Jul, 2013 7:00 pm

Good work James. Delighted to see a Curve Data, those are great puzzles.
Some possible additions to James's rules/ comments on his interpretations:
14. It's Japanese, but it looks like it might be solvable. Perhaps the first row says the difference is 3 and the 2nd row says the sum is 10?
22. Are you sure the rules say there can be intersections other than at a tripod? Could it be that tripods show all places where 3 lines join, but there can be other places where 4 places join?
30. I think it works if, rather than being the ship immediately adjacent to the symbol, it's the sum of all ship parts in that direction? For example in the right-most column, there are 2 segments above the arrow and 1 below, hence the inequality holds.
32. Not sure what you mean by "A thin bar indicates they are not a mirror image." Why isn't there a thick line at several places in the first column where the line goes straight on both sides?

kiwijam
Posts: 708
Joined: Wed 01 Jun, 2011 10:03 am

Re: Japanese championships

Post by kiwijam » Thu 01 Aug, 2013 12:16 am

Nilz wrote:Good work James. Delighted to see a Curve Data, those are great puzzles.
Some possible additions to James's rules/ comments on his interpretations:
14. It's Japanese, but it looks like it might be solvable. Perhaps the first row says the difference is 3 and the 2nd row says the sum is 10?
22. Are you sure the rules say there can be intersections other than at a tripod? Could it be that tripods show all places where 3 lines join, but there can be other places where 4 places join?
30. I think it works if, rather than being the ship immediately adjacent to the symbol, it's the sum of all ship parts in that direction? For example in the right-most column, there are 2 segments above the arrow and 1 below, hence the inequality holds.
32. Not sure what you mean by "A thin bar indicates they are not a mirror image." Why isn't there a thick line at several places in the first column where the line goes straight on both sides?
There's two practice Curve Datas as well. I like them too.
14. Yes it's solvable with a little effort. The first row says 'both, multiples of 3', the second says 'sum is 10'. If the actual puzzle has similar sentences then it's doable. Along those lines, puzzle 24 is a similar idea but with more complicated sentences like "left column and right column have the same sum" (although I ended up with 2 solutions...?)
22. Yes I'm sure. Look around the border of the grid, also there are two other puzzles with solutions on the practice page.
31. I see. Yes, that works better, thanks. I've updated the rules above accordingly.
32. Remember that the mirror looks at all of the two cells on both sides. In the first column, the cells are Corners or Straights in the following order: CSSSCCSSSC. The only location where four of those letters form a palindrome is in the middle (SCCS), so that is the only possibility for a thick line.

kiwijam
Posts: 708
Joined: Wed 01 Jun, 2011 10:03 am

Re: Japanese championships

Post by kiwijam » Thu 01 Aug, 2013 12:33 am

My rules for #29 turned out to be wrong, they worked for the example but not for the practice puzzles. I translated them properly and have now updated them above. The good news is they no longer require knowledge of the hiragana alphabet order.

It surprises me that there are so few Nikoli-type puzzles (I think there's a single kakuro) or 'classic' types that we've seen before.
I haven't translated the 'sudoku' test, they should be more familiar compared to the 'puzzles', and the stranger ones are probably shown on the practice page (Just one cell, Gravity, Cube, This way, Endview). But post here if you have any questions.

yuhei
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon 01 Nov, 2010 5:13 am

Re: Japanese championships

Post by yuhei » Thu 01 Aug, 2013 8:22 am

The English version of IBs were uploaded. The puzzle file will be uploaded soon.

http://jppuzzles.com/en/jnpc2013/download/
http://jppuzzles.com/en/jpc2013/download/

yuhei
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon 01 Nov, 2010 5:13 am

Re: Japanese championships

Post by yuhei » Thu 01 Aug, 2013 8:53 am

kiwijam wrote:There are practise puzzles for some of the new types at http://jppuzzles.com/en/practice/. And there's a test submission page.

Here are my personal notes.
They will give an idea of how to do each puzzle. They will not always be complete rules. I'm not convinced Puzzle 34 is exactly right. And the names might be quite wrong.

Two of the puzzles (7 and 17) require Japanese characters in the answer key. I wouldn't know how to enter them even if I solved the puzzle.
Three more (2,14,24) need some Japanese knowledge while solving, although a quick 'translate' during the test might be enough.

---------------

1) Cross Maths
Enter the digits 1 to 9 in the empty cells. The equations are always calculated from left to right or top to bottom, with no difference between the +-×÷ characters.
Solution Code: Enter the numbers in the cells marked A-D. e.g. 3489.

2) What's Next?
Japanese
[but they're multi-choice, and there's no points off for a wrong answer, so have a guess...?]

3) Beijing seek
Find three copies (two in the example) of the word Beijing, each bent at 90 degrees in one place.
Solution Code: Enter the number of letters used in the two main diagonals, A-B. e.g. 21.

4) JPC & JNPC Split
Group the areas into regions along the dotted lines, all containing either J,P,C or J,N,P,C.
Solution Code: Enter the number of different regions that touch each marked column (left to right), and each marked row (top to bottom). e.g. 3444

5) Drawing Logic
Standard Hanjie/Nonogram
Solution Code: In the specified 5x5 block, how many cells are painted? e.g. A is the central of the 9 5x5 blocks, and contains 11 (of 25) painted cells, so 11.

6) Square split
Divide the grid into perfect squares of various sizes. The clues give how many squares are found in that row/column.
SC: How many squares are there in total? e.g. 8.

7) Anarchy puzzle
Japanese.

8) Chinese Cities Scrabble
Basic Scrabble, using Japanese characters. Some words in the word list are followed by brackets which give another word that it intersects with. Treat 'subscript' characters the same as large characters (if you even notice the difference).
SC: Enter the number of characters in the arrow-marked row. e.g. 2.

9) Combination of Building Blocks
Which of the answer shapes can be constructed from the given building blocks? Two of them (one in the example) cannot.
SC: enter the two letters for the shapes that can't be constructed, in alphabetical order. e.g. B.

10) Best Tent Site
Standard Tents/Camping/Zeltlager.
SC: Enter the number of tents along the two A,B diagonals. e.g. 23.

11) Number connection
Draw a single line from 1 through 2, 3, 4, ..., passing through each cell once each.
SC: Enter the number of cells that the line passes through (strictly) between the given points. e.g. 1to2 = 2 cells, 4to5 = 8 cells, so 28.

12) Star Triplets
Draw straight lines through sets of three stars. The lines cannot touch or cross. Use all the stars.
SC: How many lines cross each column, left to right. e.g. 01332.

13) Indecision of Ls
Paint some areas blacks to create L-shapes with width one. The Ls do not touch each other, even diagonally. There will be no 2x2 white regions anywhere.
SC: Give the number of painted cells in the directions of the arrows A,B, e.g. 33.

14) Find number pairs
Japanese

15) Form of love
Pair up the little polyomino cells. Draw the polyomino (same orientation) so that it includes the paired cell, and the two polyominoes touch along an edge at least but don't overlap. Each pair of polyominoes cannot touch another pair along an edge.
SC: Give the number of used cells in the directions of the arrows A,B, e.g. 32.

16) Number Net
Write a 1-7 in each empty cell. Each triple contains three different digits.
If two triples are connected by a "1" then they have exactly one identical digit in the same position. If two triples are connected by a "2" then they have exactly two identical digit in the same positions. If two triples are connected by a tilda "~" then they have the same three digits but all in different positions.
SC: Enter the contents of the cells marked A-D, e.g. 4664.

17) Pass search
Japanese

18) Carpet circuit
Draw a line from the start arrow to the finish arrow passing through some cells, and not crossing any thick lines. The numbers show how many of te surrounding four shaded squares are visited by the line.
SC: Enter the letters that the line passes through, in order. e.g. BAC.

19) Star Battle
Place 1 star in each row, column and region. They cannot touch each other even diagonally.
SC: Give the number of stars in the directions of the arrows A,B, e.g. 10.

20) Doublet Formula
Enter digits from 1-9 in the empty cells to make the equations correct. Only one digit will change between any pair of consecutive rows, the others will stay the same.
SC: Enter the contents of the cells marked A-D, e.g. 1163.

21) Sum Block Division
Divide the grid into regions containing two numbers each. The size of the region equals the sum of the two numbers. Regions of the same size cannot touch each other (i.e. fillomino).
SC: Enter the size of the regions that contain the cells marked A-D, e.g. 5656.

22) Tripod Division
Divide the grid into regions of size 4. Two regions with the same shape (i.e. I,L,O,T,Z) cannot touch along an edge. A circle indicates the wall must branch into three pieces at that point (branching can also occur where there are no circles).
SC: Enter the shape of the regions that contain the cells marked A-D, e.g. LTZI. (note use Z, not S as in LITS puzzles)

23) Curve Data
Draw shapes into the grid, one through each symbol, so that every cell is used exactly once. The symbols show how that shape bends and branches, although the lengths of the line segments can be distorted.
SC: Give the number of cells used by the largest symbol. e.g. 7.

24) Reasoning Place
Japanese

25) ONDO-K
Basic Thermometers.
No idea why this name is in Roman letters instead of Japanese characters, and Ondo is a type of Japanese folk music...?
SC: Give the number of painted cells in the directions of the arrows A,B, e.g. 21.

26) Sum Cross
Basic Kakuro.
Why do we give it a Japanese name, and they give it an English name? Perhaps it is a trademark there.
SC: Enter the contents of the cells marked A-D, e.g. 4327.

27) Consecutive Sum Cross
Normal kakuro rules, but also a thick bar is drawn between every pair of adjacent cells that differ by exactly one.
SC: Enter the contents of the cells marked A-D, e.g. 4327.

28) ABC Place
Easy as ABCD puzzle, clues show the first visible letter. The example uses ABC instead of ABCD.
SC: Enter the contents of the cells that the arrow points at, using "X" for empty cells. e.g. XCXXX.

29) Sorcerer (also Lines)
Each row and column contains an A,B,C, and D (ABC in example). Rows or columns with the same symbol have their letters in the same order. Rows or columns with different symbols have their letters in a different order. The only special symbol is the "A"-character (あ) which always has the order "ABCD" (or "ABC").
SC: Enter the contents of the cells that the arrow points at, using "X" for empty cells. e.g. XXAXAX.

30) Battleship
Normal Battleships.
SC: Give the number of ship cells in the directions of the arrows A,B, e.g. 22.

31) Inequality Battleship
Normal Battleships rules, plus the equality and inequality signs show the comparative number of ship-filled cells on each side of the symbol, along that whole row/column. No ships can be drawn on the symbols themselves.
SC: Give the number of ship cells in the directions of the arrows A,B, e.g. 12.

32) Symmetry Loop
Draw a single loop that passes through every cell. A thick bar inside the grid indicates that the two cells on each side of the bar are a mirror image of each other. A thin bar indicates they are not a mirror image.
SC: For the given rows, give the number of corners in the loop. e.g. 6466.

33) BLT Sandwich
What a great name for a puzzle!
Each row and column has two slices of bread (P), one bacon (B), one lettuce (L), and one tomato (T) (plus two empty cells). Note that the Japanese usually use English words for foreign items, but in the case of bread "Pan" comes from the Portuguese word, they were the first Europeans to reach Japan. "Tempura" is also originally a Portuguese word, but now I'm off-topic...
The outer clues give, in no particular order, the ingredients that are between the two breads of that row/column. An "x" indicates that there are no ingredients between the two breads.
SC: Enter the contents of the shaded row, using "X" for an empty cell. e.g. BXPTLPX.
[Hint for starting Example: Where can an L go along the bottom row?]

34) Masked One-sided Hex Pieces
Place all the pieces into the grid without overlapping. They can be rotated but not reflected. Each shape includes one number. Shapes with the same numbers are a reflection of each other.
I think the final puzzle will have pieces of size 6, rather than size 5 of the example.
SC: Enter the numbers inside the regions that contain the cells marked A-D, e.g. 1432.
Hi kiwijam, Thank you so much for your effort!

Almost all of your translations are right. Here are some supplements:
11) Number connection (in my translation Link Numbers)
There might be a cell where a path doesn't go through (similar to Numberlink)
19) Star Battle
The number of stars in each row/column/region is specified below the grid.

I think puzzles which are hard to solve without any knowledge of Japanese are some of 02), 07), and 17) .

kiwijam
Posts: 708
Joined: Wed 01 Jun, 2011 10:03 am

Re: Japanese championships

Post by kiwijam » Thu 01 Aug, 2013 11:46 pm

yuhei wrote: I think puzzles which are hard to solve without any knowledge of Japanese are some of 02), 07), and 17) .
Hi Yuhei,

Thanks for providing an English instruction book, it is much better than mine! I am happy I was quite close. :)

You suggest Japanese knowledge is not required for puzzles 14 and 24. Will they have Japanese text and English text in the puzzle book?
e.g. it will say "Both of them are multiples of 3" and "両方、3の倍数".
Or are there two puzzle books for the two languages?

It looks like a great collection of puzzles!

yuhei
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon 01 Nov, 2010 5:13 am

Re: Japanese championships

Post by yuhei » Fri 02 Aug, 2013 1:07 am

kiwijam wrote:
yuhei wrote: I think puzzles which are hard to solve without any knowledge of Japanese are some of 02), 07), and 17) .
Hi Yuhei,

Thanks for providing an English instruction book, it is much better than mine! I am happy I was quite close. :)

You suggest Japanese knowledge is not required for puzzles 14 and 24. Will they have Japanese text and English text in the puzzle book?
e.g. it will say "Both of them are multiples of 3" and "両方、3の倍数".
Or are there two puzzle books for the two languages?

It looks like a great collection of puzzles!
We prepared two booklets, One is in Japanese and the other is in English.
So the conditions in puzzle 14 and 24 are written in each language.
I think English version puzzle booklet will be uploaded soon...

yuhei
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon 01 Nov, 2010 5:13 am

Re: Japanese championships

Post by yuhei » Fri 02 Aug, 2013 3:21 am

The encrypted puzzle booklets have been uploaded.
http://jppuzzles.com/en/jnpc2013/download/
http://jppuzzles.com/en/jpc2013/download/

Japan Number Place Championship (JNPC2013): August 3rd 10:00-12:00 (JST; UTC+9:00)
Japan Puzzle Championship (JPC2013): August 3rd 14:00-16:30 (JST; UTC+9:00)

yuhei
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon 01 Nov, 2010 5:13 am

Re: Japanese championships

Post by yuhei » Sun 04 Aug, 2013 9:40 am

Japan NumberPlace Championship & Japan Puzzle Championship 2013 are over.
Results of both championships are released.
You can see overall results on the following pages (in Japanese);
http://jppuzzles.com/wp-content/uploads ... Cscore.pdf
http://jppuzzles.com/wp-content/uploads ... Cscore.pdf
<JNPC>
1st: Kota Morinishi 472pts
2nd: Takuya Sugimoto 442pts
3rd: Hideaki Jo 431pts
4th: Jakub Hrazdira 413pts
5th: Nikola Zivanovic 368pts
6th: Taro Arimatsu 363pts
7th: Minyoung Joo 360pts
8th: Takeshi Kawasaki 347 pts
9th: Sebastian Matschke 337pts
10th: Salih Alan 331 pts
<JPC>
1st: Kota Morinishi 536pts
2nd: Hideaki Jo 503pts
3th: Maho Yokota 484pts
4th: Takuya Sugimoto 475pts
5th: Taro Arimatsu 438pts
6th: Takeya Saikachi 422pts
7th: Ken Endo 422pts
8th: Yuta Nagata 390pts
9th: James McGowan 377pts <-----Great!!!
10th: Takeshi Kawasaki 370pts

Especially for international players, thank you very much for your participation!
And everyone can enjoy our puzzles at any time.
http://jppuzzles.com/en/jnpc2013/download/
http://jppuzzles.com/en/jpc2013/download/

detuned
Posts: 2029
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Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Japanese championships

Post by detuned » Sun 04 Aug, 2013 9:37 pm

I massively botched my time zone calculations and woke up on Saturday to find out everything was over. Kota seems to be on ominous looking form, but nicely done there James :)

longduo
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Re: Japanese championships

Post by longduo » Mon 11 Nov, 2013 7:45 am

I wouldn't know how to enter them even if I solved the puzzle.

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